Medium Corp.
29 June 2016

Beyond Sight

Pragnachakshu, founded by Mukta Dagli and her husband Pankaj, both of whom are blind, doesn’t focus solely on teaching Braille alongside a standard elementary education. Instead, students at Pragnachakshu, which situated in Surendranagar, a bustling city in the state of Gujarat, are taught a number of vocational skills in addition to academic studies. They are trained to be electrical engineering apprentices as well as cosmetologists, chefs, and computer engineers.

Walk around the open-air courtyard of Pragnachakshu and you’d be hard-pressed to tell you’re at a charitable institute for blind females in need; the energy of the campus is electric. Rows of students listen to a coding lecture in an upstairs classroom, enraptured as they type away strings of code. A group of younger students sing at choir practice, draped lazily over a wooden staircase. A duo plays chess, feeling out rooks from pawns with their fingers, while a trio practices for an upcoming cooking competition, churning out parathas with the speed and precision of veteran chefs.

For students who come to Pragnachakshu, most of whom are from impoverished backgrounds, the first brush with education can be wholly overwhelming. Entering a supportive atmosphere where girls are valued isn’t always an easy transition.

Full Article: Medium

Beyond Sight
Beyond Sight

Beyond Sight
Beyond Sight

Beyond Sight
Beyond Sight

Beyond Sight

Beyond Sight

Beyond Sight

Beyond Sight

Beyond Sight

Beyond Sight

Beyond Sight

Beyond Sight

Beyond Sight
Beyond Sight

Beyond Sight

Beyond Sight

Beyond Sight